Air Conditioning Troubleshooting A/C Blows hot on one side 2002 2003 2004 2005 Thunderbird

BIRDSALL

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Thunderbird Year
2005
We’ll after 3 years of jerking around with my a/c, charging and replacement of my DCCV it seems my problem is solved. I brought my car to Ford yet again over this past summer and they had it well over 5 weeks on 3 separate visits. They dye tested at least 3 times and recharged with Freon 3 times, replaced my compressor which NEVER had a leak after telling them NOT to replace it. The a/c still wouldn’t hold a charge past a week. Finally 2 weeks ago after the compressor change out failed they decided to check the valve behind the front drivers tire on the frame of the car and it was damaged and not seating properly…..
I have a bunch of comments I want to use next but better not.
I just did a round trip to NY and I was freezing in the car, which was a good thing. I’ve talked to the service manager and have told him I expect a refund of $1,200 dollars. $900 for the compressor and labor and $300 for two recharges that they should NEVER had done…
 
Joined
May 2, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2002
Yesterday the wife's 02 started blowing hot air out of the dash driver side vents, passenger side vents were still blowing cold. This also happened one time last summer and I ran the driver temp adjustment all the way hot then all the way cold and that fixed it until yesterday. Tried the same trick yesterday and it worked for about 5 minutes or so then would go back to blowing hot on just the drivers side. I tried this several times and each time it would fix it for just a few minutes. Does this sound like the heater control valve part # YG-355? If not what might it be? Thanks!
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2002
Had my 02 in the shop for leaking compressor and not getting anything but hot air untill you set temps at 65. Replaced compressor, dryer, pulled dash to replace parts there and the dual coolant control valve.. Got it back and i get requested temp….off and on. It blows what you set it at for a while, then switches to hot for a while. Goes back and forth between set temp and hot. The climate control module is about the only thing I have not fixed. Does anyone have any input on the “Repair kit“ group mention above?
 
Joined
Feb 9, 2019
Thunderbird Year
2002
I have had problems with this car since the day I bought it. ( 2 Years ago ) The A/C never worked 100% I have no confidence in ever getting it right and am tired of spending money trying to correct this dumbass designed car. Hydraulic fan, duel fuel pumps, A/C service port behind the front left wheel, always adjusting the drop on the windows when opening or closing the doors, transmission problems, rubber bushings that fall apart etc. I like old school Thunderbirds, not this crap
I've had my '02 bird for 3 years and had to replace a $29 evaporative discharge air temp sensor, and repair the FEM and a botched workaround by some previous owner on the instrument cluster and have put 12,000 miles on it for about $250 in repairs; less than my Durango and Tundra. They are certainly no more trouble than classic cars (of which I've had plenty).
 
Joined
May 7, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2004
So driving to Wally World this morning and all of the sudden hot air started coming out of the AC vents - so I hit all the buttons- no change - so I just turned the d#@& thing off and did my shopping - return to the car and the AC started working again - now I have to add that I’ve only owned this car a month now so I don’t have a clue what’s been done to the car maintenance wise. Any advise besides low coolant as a reason this happens.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2018
Thunderbird Year
2002
One side is cool and the drivers side is putting out warm air. My mechanic says it is an actuator! He said the dash would have to come out to get to it! Anyone else have this issue and a better remedy ??
 

biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 9, 2003

Aquarius

Active Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2015
Thunderbird Year
2003
Mine did this at the end of last season I thought I'd get after it in the spring. I took it out this season and, viola! it's blowing cold air again. last month I was driving as the original poster says the passenger side started blowing hot air. Well, it had been perfect driving weather, and no need for the AC. last week, I get the car washed and I turn on the air while it was going through the wash. Get in the car and both sides are working fine and have been now all week. Go Figure! I had the same experience with the dreaded CD player fiasco a few years ago. CD was stuck , and when I took it out of storage we were cleaning it up and wifey pushes the eject button and the CD ejects! Again, Go Figure!!
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2005
Thunderbird Year
2003
@Dirty Harry it is obvious that your mechanic is not knowledgeable about how the Retro Bird HVAC system works.
The system does not have any mixer doors, so it has no actuators to regulate the temperature.
The mechanic needs to get a Ford service manual for the Thunderbird and read it.

There is a tech bulletin on LS DATC system, here it is:
LACK OF COOLING FROM DRIVER &/OR PASSENGER SIDE VENTS - VEHICLES WITH DATC ONLY TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETIN Reference Number(s): 03-3-4, Date of Issue: February 17, 2003 FORD: 2002 Thunderbird LINCOLN: 2000-2002 LS Superceded Bulletin(s): 00-15-3, Date of Issue: July 24, 2000 Related Ref Number(s): 00-15-3, 00-6-5, 03-3-4 ARTICLE BEGINNING DESCRIPTION NOTE: This bulletin supersedes Technical Service Bulletin 00-15-3 dated July 24, 2000. Article 00-15-3 is being republished in its entirety to update the models covered and to update the Basic Causal Part number. CLIMATE CONTROL - LACK OF COOLING FROM DRIVER AND/OR PASSENGER SIDE VENTS - VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH DUAL AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL (DATC) ONLY ISSUE Some vehicles may exhibit a lack of A/C cooling from either the driver or passenger side vents or an extreme temperature difference between the driver and passenger side on vehicles with DATC (Dual Automatic Temperature Control). This may be caused by a faulty DCCV (Dual Coolant Control Valve), a faulty DATC control assembly, or faulty electrical circuits. ACTION Inspect and service as necessary, electrical circuits, DCCV and DATC control assembly. Refer to the following Service Procedure to aid in diagnosis and repair. SERVICE PROCEDURE NOTE: MAKE EVERY ATTEMPT TO VERIFY THE CONCERN. IF THE A/C COMPRESSOR IS NOT OPERATING UNDER ANY DATC COMMAND THIS ARTICLE WILL NOT ASSIST IN THE REPAIR. REFER TO THE APPROPRIATE WORKSHOP MANUAL FOR DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR INFORMATION. NOTE: BEFORE PERFORMING THIS ARTICLE ALL APPLICABLE PIN POINT TESTS IN THE WORKSHOP MANUAL, BASED ON SYMPTOM, MUST BE PERFORMED. IN ADDITION, BASIC DATC SYSTEM CHECKS SUCH AS REFRIGERANT CHARGE LEVEL AND DATC SYSTEM Page 1 of 6 LACK OF COOLING FROM DRIVER &/OR PASSENGER SIDE VENTS - VEHICLE...
POWERS AND GROUNDS MUST BE VERIFIED AS ACCEPTABLE BEFORE CONTINUING. Start engine and ensure it is at full operating temperature. Set DATC to 90 F (32 C), with blower on high and recirculation and panel modes selected. Allow vehicle to remain in this mode for 5 minutes minimum. 1. Set DATC to 60 F (15 C), with blower on high and recirculation and panel modes selected. Allow vehicle to remain in this mode for 5 minutes minimum. 2. Measure the output temperature at the registers. Depending on local current atmospheric conditions, the coldest reading may be approximately 45 F (7 C). 3. If sufficient temperature drop is achieved across all registers within +/- 10 F (6 C), the vehicle is operating normally. No additional service is required. Stop procedure at this point and return vehicle to customer. a. If all or some measured outputs are greater than 45 F (7 C), or temperature difference between registers is greater than 10 F (6 C), continue with Step 4. b. NOTE: WITH THE DATC TEMPERATURE SET THE SAME IN BOTH ZONES, SOME LEVEL OF TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE FROM DRIVER SIDE TO PASSENGER SIDE SHOULD BE CONSIDERED NORMAL. A DIFFERENCE OF UP TO 10 F (6 C) MAY BE OBSERVED DEPENDING ON AMBIENT TEMPERATURE, HUMIDITY LEVEL AND IN-VEHICLE TEMPERATURE. Open the hood and remove the cowl vent screen to gain access to the heater hoses at the heater core inlets/outlet. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 501-02 for details. 4. Clamp off the three (3) heater hoses going into and out of the heater core, as close to the heater core as possible. Refer to Fig. 1 . 5. If A/C performance is restored, remove the clamps from the heater hoses and proceed to Step 7. If A/C performance is not restored, the concern is not caused by the DCCV. Remove the clamps from the heater hoses, restore the vehicle to original condition and refer to the Workshop Manual, Section 412-00 for further diagnostics. Do not continue with this article. 6. CAUTION: DO NOT SHORT THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT WIRING HARNESS C134 (LS) OR C1168 (THUNDERBIRD) PINS 3 OR 6 TO PINS 1 OR 4. DAMAGE TO THE DATC MODULE MAY RESULT IF THIS OCCURS. Shut off engine. Unplug C134/C1168 and check the resistance of the DCCV. Measure across pins 4-6, and pins 3-4. Refer to Fig. 2 and Fig. 3 . 7. If resistance is above or below 13-20 ohms, inspect C1034 at the DCCV for connection integrity, corrosion and damage. Repair as needed to restore. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. a. If resistance is above or below 13-20 ohms and C1034 is not at fault, replace the DCCV, Part Number XW4Z-18495-AA. Refer to "Replacing the DCCV" at the end of this article for details. b. If resistance is acceptable, continue with Step 8. c. With C134/C1168 disconnected, verify available voltage to the DCCV. 8.
image1.jpgimage2.jpgimage3.jpg



Start engine and set DATC to 60 F (15 C). Measure the voltage between the engine compartment harness (14290 side) C134/C1168 pin 4 and ground. 9. If voltage is less than 12 volts, check for open F101 or repair circuit 30-FB3 to restore voltage. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. a. If voltage is greater than 12 volts, proceed to Step 10. Refer to Fig. 3 . b. With C134/C1168 disconnected, lift the lid on the Underhood FPDB (Front Power Distribution Box) and locate the power feed terminal at the drivers side, rear corner of the box. The lid must be lifted for the terminal bolt to be visible. 10. Verify DATC control assembly is providing a ground for the DCCV Solenoids. Start engine and set DATC to 60 F (15 C). 11. Measure voltage between the FPDB power feed and pin 3 of C134/C1168. If greater than 12 volts, proceed to Step 11d. a. If less than 12 volts, inspect circuit 91S-FB3 for high resistance or an open between C134/C1168 pin 3, and C228b (LS) or C228a (Thunderbird) pin 5, at the DATC control assembly. Repair wiring as required. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. b. If circuit 91S-FB3 is OK, install a new DATC control assembly, Part Number XW4Z- 19980-CA (2000-2002 Lincoln LS), 1W6Z-19980-AA (2002 Thunderbird). Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 412-04 for details. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. c. Measure voltage between the FPDB power feed to pin 6 of C134/C1168. If greater than 12 volts, the DCCV may have a mechanical concern internally. Replace the DCCV, Part Number XW4Z-18495-AA. Refer to "Replacing the DCCV" at the end of this article for details. d. If less than 12 volts, inspect circuit 91S-FB4 for high resistance or an open between C134/C1168 pin 6, and C228b (LS) or C228a (Thunderbird) pin 6, at the DATC control assembly. Repair wiring as required. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. e. If circuit 91S-FB4 is OK, install a new DATC control assembly, Part Number XW4Z- 19980-CA (2000-2002 Lincoln LS), 1W6Z-19980-AA (2002 Thunderbird). Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 412-04 for details. Verify repair by repeating Steps 1-3, and return vehicle to customer. f. REPLACING THE DCCV - V8 ENGINES REMOVAL Drain the engine coolant. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-03 for details. 1. Remove the air cleaner outlet pipe. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-12 for details. 2. Remove the radiator upper sight shield. 3. Remove the passenger side upper radiator support bracket. 4. Disconnect the upper radiator hose from radiator. 5. Remove air conditioning receiver drier retainer and position aside. 6. Disconnect the auxiliary coolant flow pump electrical connector. 7. Remove the 2 (two) bolts from the auxiliary pump on radiator fan shroud. 8. Disconnect the heater hose at intake manifold and at the bottom of auxiliary pump. 9.
Remove the auxiliary coolant flow pump. 10. Raise the vehicle. 11. Remove the lower splash shield. 12. Remove the bolts for the DCCV bracket. 13. Lower the vehicle. 14. Remove the retainers for hydraulic cooling fan reservoir (passenger side of engine) and position aside. 15. Mark the heater hoses at the DCCV for identification and disconnect the 3 (three) quick disconnect fittings. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 412-00. 16. Disconnect the DCCV electrical connector. 17. Disconnect the heater hose at upper radiator hose. 18. Remove the DCCV. 19. Transfer the hoses and bracket from old DCCV to new DCCV. 20. INSTALLATION Reverse the removal procedure to install new DCCV. 1. Torque the DCCV bracket bolts to 80 in-lb (9 N.m). 2. Torque the upper hydraulic cooling fan reservoir fastener to 53 in-lb (6 N.m) and lower/side fastener to 106 in-lb (12 N.m). 3. Torque the auxiliary coolant pump fasteners to 80 in-lb (9 N.m). 4. Torque the air conditioning receiver drier to 53 in-lb (6 N.m). 5. Refill the engine coolant. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-03 for details. 6. Repeat Steps 1-3 of the diagnostic procedure to verify repair. 7. REPLACING THE DCCV - V6 ENGINES REMOVAL Drain the engine coolant. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-03 for details. 1. Mark the heater hoses at the DCCV for identification and disconnect the 3 (three) quick disconnect fittings. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 412-00 for details. 2. Remove the retainers for hydraulic cooling fan reservoir (passenger side of engine) and position aside. 3. Remove the throttle body. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-04A details. 4. Remove the IAC (Idle Air Control) valve. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-14 for details. 5. Disconnect the upper radiator hose from radiator and position aside. 6. Remove the air conditioning receiver drier retainer and position aside. 7. Disconnect the heater hoses from upper radiator hose T-fitting and water pump. 8. Disconnect the DCCV electrical connector. 9. Raise the vehicle. 10. Remove the lower splash shield. 11. Remove the bolts for DCCV at bracket. 12. Lower the vehicle. 13. Remove the DCCV valve with hoses and bracket attached. 14. Transfer the hoses and bracket from old DCCV to new DCCV. 15. INSTALLATION Reverse the removal procedure to install new DCCV. 1. Torque the DCCV bracket bolts to 80 in-lb (9 N.m). 2. Torque the upper hydraulic cooling fan reservoir fastener to 53 in-lb (6 N.m) and lower/side fastener to 106 in-lb (12 N.m). 3. Torque the air conditioning receiver drier to 53 in-lb (6 N.m). 4. Install the throttle body using a new gasket, Part Number XW4Z-9E936-BA. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-04A for details. 5. Install the IAC using a new gasket, Part Number E83Z-9F670-A. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-14 for details. 6. Refill engine coolant. Refer to Workshop Manual, Section 303-03 for details. 7. Repeat Steps 1-3 of the diagnostic procedure to verify repair. 8. PARTS INFORMATION PARTS INFORMATION

When you have the A/C blowing cold on one side and warm on the other and you know the DCCV is working correctly, use a set of A/C gauges to determine if there is enough freon in the system.
CLICK ON BELOW;
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Thunderbird Year
2003
There's a lot of "My A/C isn't working in Texas" threads - mine's a little different. I recently replaced the compressor and drier in my system as my high side only ever reached 150 psi, and the low side needed to be slightly overcharged to 70psi just to get a modicum of cold air on days below 90 degrees. I got tired of playing the odds and replaced everything. I even did a little video on it you can see here, with an alternative freon solution :

Anyway, fast forward to today and I began noticing a couple things - if I leave the controls to 60 degrees, it'll freeze my face off. If I touch the controls to 65 degrees or higher, it instantly turns stale. If I clear 80 degrees, warmer air comes from the left vent and the driver's side center vent, but cooler on the passenger center and right vent. I began thinking maybe it was the dual zone valve, but not really sure how to diagnose. If this happens, the rest of the trip remains stale with the controls back down to 60 no matter what I do. Every once in a while I can raise it to 90, feel intense heat for a minute or two, then drop it back down to 60 and it starts freezing my face again... this doesn't always work.

What does work? When I key off from my commute, leave the car for a few hours and start it up for another commute. Then it's face-freeze again which is nice, but then I'm stuck modulating the temperature by simply turning down the blower. I dare not tempt the gods living under the hood to torture me with stale air again.

Not really sure where to attack this - there are no leaks, pressures are reading 35 low, north of 170 high at idle. I only put in 24 out of the total 28 ounces this go-round, but I do have the means to top-off if need be - though I doubt it's a refrigerant capacity issue. On a side note, my car celebrated it's 20th birthday since new model year production was late summer 2002, and she just cleared 70k miles. It's been a great car for the past 4 years I've owned it, but aside from this a/c gremlin, I'm still trying to nail down a coolant leak that's about as schizophrenic as the a/c is. That's a different subject for another day.
 
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Thunderbird Year
2003
You probably have a clogged condenser,also the stale smell is most likely the cabin air filter.
It's not a smell, it's a temperature - if I leave it at 60 it's fine, but if I want to run it at say, 70, the air is substantially warmer. It's almost as if my system has 3 settings : ice cubes, locker room, sauna. There's not much of an in-between, but it definitely feels like an electrical issue where it's bleeding heater-core air without proper modulation.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Thunderbird Year
2002
Hope my story helps... No cool air after my 2002 sits in the sun and outside temp. goes over 82 degrees. Only warm air blowing both vents. It would reset after sitting overnight but then the same issue again. After reading comments here I made the mistake of having my heater control valve replaced by the Ford Dealer. I was so sure that was my problem. Anyway I still had the same problem. I got cold air in the morning and all day running until I parked the car in the sun or anywhere that got in the 80s.
I paid 600.00 for nothing. It was my fault because I skipped the diagnostics fee which would have been 150.00.
I took my car to a local shop ( Iezzi's on 422 here in Reading Pa.) I am so happy with them. The problem was the Evaporator Temperature Sensor.
The part cost about 40.00 and my total bill was only 210.00! Problem fixed!
PS...I see the part pictured here (above) it is Ford Thunderbird Climate Control Air Temperature Sensor XW4H-19C734-AB OEM
 
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biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 9, 2003
made the mistake of having my heater control valve replaced by the Ford Dealer.
This could have summarized the entire experience. LOL! For me, I use forums to get an idea what is wrong on stuff I can replace myself.
Example, the part you had replaced for 600.00 is 45 bucks on Amazon. If it doesn't work, I have a new part and go on to the Climate control air sensor.
My fiance worked at the service department at the local Ford dealership and 25 years ago, I worked at the Ford dealer. There is nothing special about most of the mechanics at the big dealerships. Half of them are clowns watching porn on their phone while working on the cars, and I'm being serious. I did have a 3.55 Gear and near rear axle put in my Mustang at the Ford dealership, but I went to the one outside the big city where a "Good Ole Boy" who knows his stuff did the job. They don't use the highly skilled mechanics for the small stuff from my experience.
 
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