What did you do today on your 1955-1957

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Finally got my passenger window back in. pulled the whole regulator assembly, cleaned an lubricated including the gear box with white lithium grease and replaced the rollers. Installed a new door panel but moving the trim from on to the new was another instruction on ingenuity. I never knew they moved that fast. I guess for safety reasons many years back they made them slow down.
Anyway took it out for a shake down cruise and ran into a local club showing off their different builds. All ran well and met some good people.
 

1957Bird

Well-Known Member
Well, Spring has arrived and my accumulated parts (alum radiator and flex fan) have made their way onto the car. Not that we’ve had any hot weather yet, but temp gauges seem much more consistent and stable. I’d call that a win! Found a great deal on a used Prestige soft top in excellent condition. Installation of that with completely disassembled swing arm assy took some head scratching
But in the end persistence prevailed.
very happy to have that tucked behind the seat. It will make leaving the yard when there’s a chance of an afternoon shower a bit less contemplative:) Oh and she’s going out to hav all new bushings put in the front end. darn! These beauties can be money pits, can’t they. But love it!!
 
I installed new harnesses and
After getting the wiring in on the 1955 yesterday I installed the steering column to discover that the channel for the wires on the turn signal switch is twisted and needs fixed or replaced, When I try to take the steering column off It doesn't want to come out, I hear a metal to metal thud. So far I'm unable to get it to slip out.

Two years into restoration and it seems nothing was a easy fix with no issues,,

Do I love it or hate it.. jury is still out

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OhioTbird

Active Member
Mid Ohio race course has an annual Vintage Gran Prix race. (This weekend). They have a classic car parade on Sunday where they do a couple laps around the course during the lunch break. Probably 50 cars in attendance.

I pre signed to participate and when I showed up the guy organizing it all said " I want that car in the front, you're number 1 behind the Pace Car."

How cool! The 57 was easily the oldest car there but also in great shape. It received a lot of attention.

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Returned to MidOhio today to watch the Indy 200 Qualifying. Now that tires are round, was able to get speeds on the way there up to 70 mph.

As soon as I parked, a beautiful 61 pulled in next to me. Talked a bit to a fun couple then watched the races. Every time I checked on the car, the two were surrounded by
admirers.

They sure turn heads.

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doug7740

Well-Known Member
I bought a new fuel filter element. I will install it in a couple of weeks. One cannot rush this type of work.
The fuel filter for your Thunderbird is located inside a glass bowl which is in the fuel line directly above your fuel pump on the driver's side of the engine compartment at the front of the engine. To insure that your car's fuel system is working properly, it is important that you periodically change the fuel filter.
When changing your fuel filter you will be working with gasoline. Please use caution!

I purchased my fuel filter from one of the Thunderbird parts suppliers; however it also can be purchased locally through NAPA. Make sure the new fuel filter comes with the rubber gasket for the glass bowl. The rubber gasket slides over the filter element. The filter should have a bit of material protruding past the filter element so the rubber gasket presses against it and holds the filter element in place against the filter housing. Before replacing the fuel filter, make sure that your car is on level ground and the engine is not running. Now find the glass bowl. The glass bowl is held in place by a wire harness with a wing nut at its base. By loosening the wing nut at the base of the glass bowl, you can push the wire harness over to one side and remove the glass bowl from the fuel filter housing. Be careful to catch any gas that may spill. The following tip is not necessary, but I found that it made replacing the fuel filter much easier.

Using a 1/2" and 9/16" wrench, loosen the two brass gas line fittings which connect the fuel filter housing on both sides to the fuel lines. You will only need to loosen the fittings enough to allow you to swing the filter housing upside down so that the fuel filter element will be facing up, directly at you. Once you have rotated the filter housing, remove the fuel filter element. Next, install the new filter element with the paper side towards the fuel filter housing and install the new gasket over the filter element being careful not to fold or kink it. Make sure the gasket fits evenly in the recessed channel of the filter housing. Reinstall the glass bowl and place the wire harness back in its original position around the glass bowl. Tighten up the wing nut so that the glass bowl fits snugly into the fuel filter housing. Make sure your gasket did not shift out of the channel in the filter housing. Turn the filter housing, with the glass bowl attached, back into its original position so that the glass bowl is underneath the filter housing. Now retighten the brass gas line fittings on both sides, start the engine and check for leaks.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
I bought a new fuel filter element. I will install it in a couple of weeks. One cannot rush this type of work.
LOL. So you have no pressing projects and you can just hop in and go for a drive? I'm jealous. Yes take your time with your favorite entertainment on, your favorite beverage on the work bench and just tinker. Your wife knows where you are and she can do her own thing. My wife calls my car my 'approved' mistress.
 

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
Lots of projects but we were called away to comfort an old friend in another state. I am frothing at the bit to get to the little projects so I can fix my Mustang.
 

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
The fuel filter for your Thunderbird is located inside a glass bowl which is in the fuel line directly above your fuel pump on the driver's side of the engine compartment at the front of the engine. To insure that your car's fuel system is working properly, it is important that you periodically change the fuel filter.
When changing your fuel filter you will be working with gasoline. Please use caution!

I purchased my fuel filter from one of the Thunderbird parts suppliers; however it also can be purchased locally through NAPA. Make sure the new fuel filter comes with the rubber gasket for the glass bowl. The rubber gasket slides over the filter element. The filter should have a bit of material protruding past the filter element so the rubber gasket presses against it and holds the filter element in place against the filter housing. Before replacing the fuel filter, make sure that your car is on level ground and the engine is not running. Now find the glass bowl. The glass bowl is held in place by a wire harness with a wing nut at its base. By loosening the wing nut at the base of the glass bowl, you can push the wire harness over to one side and remove the glass bowl from the fuel filter housing. Be careful to catch any gas that may spill. The following tip is not necessary, but I found that it made replacing the fuel filter much easier.

Using a 1/2" and 9/16" wrench, loosen the two brass gas line fittings which connect the fuel filter housing on both sides to the fuel lines. You will only need to loosen the fittings enough to allow you to swing the filter housing upside down so that the fuel filter element will be facing up, directly at you. Once you have rotated the filter housing, remove the fuel filter element. Next, install the new filter element with the paper side towards the fuel filter housing and install the new gasket over the filter element being careful not to fold or kink it. Make sure the gasket fits evenly in the recessed channel of the filter housing. Reinstall the glass bowl and place the wire harness back in its original position around the glass bowl. Tighten up the wing nut so that the glass bowl fits snugly into the fuel filter housing. Make sure your gasket did not shift out of the channel in the filter housing. Turn the filter housing, with the glass bowl attached, back into its original position so that the glass bowl is underneath the filter housing. Now retighten the brass gas line fittings on both sides, start the engine and check for leaks.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue
Very nice write-up. I have seen several fuel filter assemblies that leak because the THUMB screw was tightened with pliers and over time the casting warped causing a leak. One needs only needs to tighten the thumb screw just enough to seal. I like the suggestion of inverting the filter.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Arggh! Took it for a test drive. misfire minimal. Then flat out died at a stop light. After a few min it started and got me home. Replaced the Chinese condenser I just installed a few moths ago. Fired up fine and not 50 yards from my driveway died again. Explitives uttered. When pushing it into my driveway the slight ramp, a low car, midsized truck caused the bumpers to slip,..... cracked tail light lenses. Double ARRGGHH! Ordered new lenses and a new correct coil thinking it's the last thing I haven't changed in over 35 years. Hope this is my final solution.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Arggh! Took it for a test drive. misfire minimal. Then flat out died at a stop light. After a few min it started and got me home. Replaced the Chinese condenser I just installed a few moths ago. Fired up fine and not 50 yards from my driveway died again. Explitives uttered. When pushing it into my driveway the slight ramp, a low car, midsized truck caused the bumpers to slip,..... cracked tail light lenses. Double ARRGGHH! Ordered new lenses and a new correct coil thinking it's the last thing I haven't changed in over 35 years. Hope this is my final solution.
At least while I'm waiting for my parts I'll get around to puting aluminum foil over the reflectors to brighten them up. Have to tale the lenses off anyway.
 

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
Working on a 63 Bird I went through 3 ignition condensers and two coils before changing it over Pertronix. Never failed again.
I cut open the condensers that failed and they were all china junk that did not have a good contact and arced themselves to a quick death.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Working on a 63 Bird I went through 3 ignition condensers and two coils before changing it over Pertronix. Never failed again.
I cut open the condensers that failed and they were all china junk that did not have a good contact and arced themselves to a quick death.
The condenser I lust installed was made in Mexico at least. I'm hoping the coil is the problem as it warms up the engine eruns worse. I ordered the new one from CASCO. The way it started stumbling and then just die Points me in that direction After all I think it may be the original.
 
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Ward 57

Well-Known Member
View attachment 17646
Took the 55 to the National Street Rod Association mini nats in OKC this weekend.
Now that's what you call a sleeper.

Went out to the garage Wiped down my car with the polish dust infused towel wishing I could drive it. Its been the story ( if you have read my latest posts) Drive 10 min thinking NOW I've 'gotter' done only to have something else fail. And then wait another week or two for the proper parts to start the cycle again.

Found another project while waiting for parts. The wheels are supposed to be the same color as the body. Mine are black or showing through with the coral sand original color behind the black. Wheel one painted and tomorrow will pull off the masking and put the wheel cover back on. At least I'll have some bright white as the cheap tires I needed in an emergency Turned yellow in a heartbeat and refuse to brighten.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
I'm so frustrated. Got my parts, installed them, Pulled a couple of wheel covers to paint the rims body color. I have one wheel cover that refuses to go back on. Get it 3/4 on and give it one more smack. Then the whole thing pops off. I used to work at Goodyear and have done hundreds But I must have lost my touch. Any tried and true methods?
 
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