What did you do today on your 1955-1957

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
Now that I am back in AZ I had a few hours to convince the engine to start after installing a new fuel pump. First I replaced the very plugged fuel filter. Of course, the glass bowl would not come off so I removed the assembly from the car and cleaned it before proceeding. Then a strong twist of the wrist caused a slight movement of the glass bowl so I gently wiggled it loose from the housing and cleaned it up and re-assembled it. I checked it for warpage by gently holding the bowl to the housing with the gasket in place and sucking on it. It held a vacuum so that was good news.

As I started to put the filter assy back on I noticed that the p.O. Had used plumbers tape on the compression fitting threads. Not good. Cleaned that off so the fitting would assemble correctly.

Cranked the engine but no start. The fuel filter bowl slowly raised to 1/2 full which is ok, but it was not moving much fuel per stroke. I rechecked the fittings including the flex line to steel line. Opps the fittings were tight to each other but swiveled on the steel line. Loosened the fitting and retightened until all was tight. The engine then started and ran well, however without a test drive.

Now for a question. I installed a new flex line from casco and it is not as rigid a material as the original. It is quite soft actually. Would this sharp curve cause the line to pinch closed or restrict fuel flow? The new line is the same length as the old one but appears slightly flattened in the curve. I plan to remove the flex and install a slightly longer one to hopefully release some strain.
55birdflex.jpg
 
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biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I'm so frustrated. Got my parts, installed them, Pulled a couple of wheel covers to paint the rims body color. I have one wheel cover that refuses to go back on. Get it 3/4 on and give it one more smack. Then the whole thing pops off. I used to work at Goodyear and have done hundreds But I must have lost my touch. Any tried and true methods?
I undeleted your post. What did you do to resolve this? Ths may help someone else one day.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Now that I am back in AZ I had a few hours to convince the engine to start after installing a new fuel pump. First I replaced the very plugged fuel filter. Of course, the glass bowl would not come off so I removed the assembly from the car and cleaned it before proceeding. Then a strong twist of the wrist caused a slight movement of the glass bowl so I gently wiggled it loose from the housing and cleaned it up and re-assembled it. I checked it for warpage by gently holding the bowl to the housing with the gasket in place and sucking on it. It held a vacuum so that was good news.

As I started to put the filter assy back on I noticed that the p.O. Had used plumbers tape on the compression fitting threads. Not good. Cleaned that off so the fitting would assemble correctly.

Cranked the engine but no start. The fuel filter bowl slowly raised to 1/2 full which is ok, but it was not moving much fuel per stroke. I rechecked the fittings including the flex line to steel line. Opps the fittings were tight to each other but swiveled on the steel line. Loosened the fitting and retightened until all was tight. The engine then started and ran well, however without a test drive.

Now for a question. I installed a new flex line from casco and it is not as rigid a material as the original. It is quite soft actually. Would this sharp curve cause the line to pinch closed or restrict fuel flow? The new line is the same length as the old one but appears slightly flattened in the curve. I plan to remove the flex and install a slightly longer one to hopefully release some strain.
View attachment 17946
On my fuel pump there is an 'L' brass fitting on the pump so the flex line is basically a straight shot instead of having to take a sharp turn.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
I undeleted your post. What did you do to resolve this? Ths may help someone else one day.
Lots of perseverance. Realigned the spring tabs, the main part of the tab was a tight fit but some of the 'fingers' were folded over a little and not biting. Finally sat on the ground, lined up the bottom then put both feet on either side to hold it in place and smacked the top edge with a white rubber hammer.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Lots of perseverance. Realigned the spring tabs, the main part of the tab was a tight fit but some of the 'fingers' were folded over a little and not biting. Finally sat on the ground, lined up the bottom then put both feet on either side to hold it in place and smacked the top edge with a white rubber hammer.
Then because the wheel looked so good I decided to tackle the yellow white walls on my cheap emergency tires. I took a wire brush on my drill to be aggressive as nothing else worked. Good lord! The one tire I did looks even worse. Black spots bleeding through the white wall. looks like it has been splattered with mud. At least it's on a rear wheel with the wheel cover covers 1/2 of it. I'll leave the rest alone as the newly painted wheels almost look like a small white wall. The tires are 3-4 years old with less than 100 miles on them ( long story ) so I won't be replacing them any time soon. May consider add-on white walls as I'm never near curbs to accidentally scuff and wrinkle them.
 

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
@Ward 57 I happened to have a 90 fitting so I installed it without an undue amount of bloodshed. Yup the line is no longer stretched and no longer is pinched. I would test it but its 109 outside and I don't need to drive it that badly.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
@Ward 57 I happened to have a 90 fitting so I installed it without an undue amount of bloodshed. Yup the line is no longer stretched and no longer is pinched. I would test it but its 109 outside and I don't need to drive it that badly.
Excellent! Who would have that in their inventory? Yup that's the way mine came from the factory. It's interesting how some of these small parts just get discarded over the years. As far as the bloodshed, I find myself leaking blood all the time. I'm 67 and my skin is now really thin. I find bruises and actual blood leaking and have no idea how I did that being so engrossed on the project.
 
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Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
I actually had 2 in my random brass fitting box! The fan shroud bit my arm a couple of times while installing the fitting into the fuel pump. I'm 4 years older than my 55 and not as peppy
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
I actually had 2 in my random brass fitting box! The fan shroud bit my arm a couple of times while installing the fitting into the fuel pump. I'm 4 years older than my 55 and not as peppy
Yup, that fan shroud can be a hazard. Had to take it off just to get to the top clamp on my lower radiator hose. Good opportunity to paint it though. Well actually I painted it when I had to replace my water pump. Got it down so it only takes a few minutes and don't loose a bolt or nut.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Yahoo!! Put on the new coil (and unfortunately new lenses and lined the reflectors with aluminum foil , they are BRIGHT)
and it runs great. Took it down to the mustang shop that does my heavy or messy repairs, B.S.d with the owner for a while to let it roast and ran great the whole time back. Now to put some miles on it and check the gas mileage.
Next project is to paint the wheels on the other side of the car. I've ordered 2" whitewall spats to finish the look.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Last Time I filled my gas tank I had a big leak. Traced it down to the sender gasket. Many years ago I got rear ended by a classic Chevy. His bumper went under mine and crushed his grill and hit my gas tank. Replaced it and over many years never filled it to the top. It was a squared gasket on the sender and was folded slightly. Finally had a reason to fill the tank again with a new gasket and it leaked again. Arghh. Thank heavens the '57 has an access panel in the trunk. Yup, that was the leak again. Cleaned all the surfaces trued up the keeper ring, lubed up the 'O' ring and re-assembled. Lesson learned. No more leak. Diagnosis is one thing but doing the repair correctly the first time while taking you time. I can't tell the number of times I've done a quick repair and had to re-visit it again later.
 

Critterpainer

Well-Known Member
Those or rings can be a challenge. At least yours is on the top and not the side like later fords. My 55 is about the last of the flat gasket ones held in with screws. Had it out about a dozen times trying to fix my sending unit. I learned one thing. the replacement sending units that they sell for 55 Fords DON'T WORK!! I freed up my original and re-did the float to get the system working.
 
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