2004 Limp mode problems

My 2004 T-Bird (24,000 miles) went into limp mode and the Ford agency said it was a throttle body but after they replaced that, it still didn't run right and went into limp mode again, immediately. Then they said that there is a bad module but they can't seem to find one and don't know when they might get one. I am wondering if I needed a throttle body in the first place ($1,600) and does anyone know anything about a module that would get me back on the road?
 

biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
1- You need an OBDII Code reader to see what error codes are being shown.

2. What module? That's pretty generic term. Get a part number or specific part name.

3. Rule out COPS as the problem.

4. I'd be angry if I paid 1600.00 to replace a throttle body and it still wouldn't run! The part is 350.00-400.00 retail.

I would be curious if you fixed the actual problem with the car, and put back in the old throttle body, that the old throttle body works.
 
Talk to the owner of the dealership and let him/her know that you are dissatisfied and would like your money refunded. He/she needs to know about the incompetent service department. That’s where the bulk of their profit is made.
 
My 2004 T-Bird (24,000 miles) went into limp mode and the Ford agency said it was a throttle body but after they replaced that, it still didn't run right and went into limp mode again, immediately. Then they said that there is a bad module but they can't seem to find one and don't know when they might get one. I am wondering if I needed a throttle body in the first place ($1,600) and does anyone know anything about a module that would get me back on the road?
Hi, I have a 2005 Tbird and have been experiencing the same exact problem. I have an extended warranty at my local Lincoln dealership so I have only to pay $100. every time it goes in. However, it adds up and the problem is never fixed!

My Tbird goes into limp mode frequently and they did replace the throttle body. I tried to argue based on everything I have read here. But they replaced the throttle body and sure enough I drove less than a mile and the wrench light came on. I turned around and brought it back. Then it was a coil. On and on.
 
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biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
They refuse to replace all the coils. They only replace one at a time. But since this happens so frequently they actually have replaced all but #8. When I pointed that out, the Service dept said it took 3 years .
Were the coils causing limp mode? If yes, this will help the OP (original poster).

PS your valve cover gasket may need replaced! This may be what is actually causing your COPS to fail. If it's leaking, your new COPS will also fail.
 
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Angry Bird

Angry Bird's 64'
They refuse to replace all the coils. They only replace one at a time. But since this happens so frequently they actually have replaced all but #8. When I pointed that out, the Service dept said it took 3 years .
You can replace the COPS for under $80 on eBay. I faced similar problems bought the new coils found a local independent garage had them replace the coils, new valve cover gaskets problem solved for under $300. I've since ordered another set of coils as back-ups.
 
Were the coils causing limp mode? If yes, this will help the OP (original poster).

PS your valve cover gasket may need replaced! This may be what is actually causing your COPS to fail. If it's leaking, your new COPS will also fail.
Thanks for the advice. Why wouldn’t the Lincoln service dept know this? Also, I am a single grandmother and cannot do my own repairs as many on here seem to do. I understand that the coils are not expensive but I would need a good mechanic to do the repairs, so my costs will always be much higher.

I will need to find a good mechanic. But not many know Thunderbirds.
 

biddle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Why wouldn’t the Lincoln service dept know this?
Valve cover gaskets leaking oil into spark plugs and/or Coils is a common issue with all cars. My girlfriend's daughter's 2009 Kia Rio just had hers changed. My girlfriend worked at a Ford dealership service department in 2018. They are greedy and often have lazy losers working as mechanics, the service advisers are the basically used car salesman of the service department making big money off the quotes they give for repairs.

I also worked at Ford Lincoln Mercury dealerships, but that was many years ago. It seems like things have definitely deteriorated. I think all businesses have a challenge finding good employees now.
 
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My 2004 T-Bird (24,000 miles) went into limp mode and the Ford agency said it was a throttle body but after they replaced that, it still didn't run right and went into limp mode again, immediately. Then they said that there is a bad module but they can't seem to find one and don't know when they might get one. I am wondering if I needed a throttle body in the first place ($1,600) and does anyone know anything about a module that would get me back on the road?
Can you get your money back??? What exactly or almost exactly the problem?
 

CodiakCB

2004 Premium, Platinum Silver/Light Sand, 1 of 127
My 2004 did a similar thing the other day; pushing accelerator did not advance the car, I idled up my driveway to the garage. Next day, called my mechanic and he said try it again or he could send a tow truck. I started it up and drove to the shop who has been taking care of this bird. They ran every test they could think about (including a throttle body cleaning) and didn't find any reason. They drove it around another day with no problem either. I picked up the car and drove up the coast hwy for several hundred miles, stopping many times along the way - no issues. I wonder if, like on older cars, it could of experianced a fuel vapor-lock, possible? Please advise! thank, Gil
 
Sometimes you just never know. I had a brand new Mercury Grand Marquis that I was driving from Jersey to Palm Beach. The AC died in Georgia and I finished the trip without it. Next morning I started it up and it worked fine. Drove it to the local dealer and they couldn’t find anything. The problem never came back. I also had a Pontiac that would breakdown every time I drove in Virginia.
 
As Biddle said above you need to use a OBD-II tester to read the codes and report them back to the forum. There are three types of dashboard warning lights for engine and transmision related problems. 1) The "Check Engine Light" refers to emisison related items and is described on page 10 and page 186 of my 2004 owners manual. 2) the "Electronic Throttle Control" (a.k.a. "wrench light") refers to safety related issues than came along with electronic throttle control and is described on page 13 of my 2004 owners manual. 3) The "check fuel cap" light is listed on page 10. This last light (#3) is pretty straigtforward; try tightening the fuel cap in its screw mechanism and if this does not work try cleaning the seals where the cap screws in. Lights #1 and #2 should not be illuminated without setting "diagnostic trouble codes" (a.k.a.DTCs) indicating the source of the problem (bad throttle sensor, misfire related to coil on plug). OBD-II testers can be bought on Amazon for $25 to $40 that can display these codes. They are not difficult to use for a reasonably handy person. If you are not handy many auto parts stores will send a clerk out to your car and run the OBD-II test for you for free, with their reward being to sell you the parts. I wouldn't go to a dealer with lights #1 or #2 without using this free service first. Type the code into a google type search and it will tell you what part is associated. Show this to the service person at the dealership. This might discourage them from the fraud of changing a $1600 part when the trouble code indicted something lower cost. The trouble codes are not a perfect system because some "root cause" faults cause other things to look bad. A skilled technician knows how to sort through these things but as has been mentioned all mechanics are not created equal, and there is some fraud. But it is highly unlikely that a failed part will not cause a trouble code to be set. For instance, while a bad throttle body may cause more than one code to be set, it is almost certain the the throttle body code (or the throttle position sensor) code will be one of them. So if a dealer changes a throttle body and this was not one of the codes scream fraud! For the do-it-your-selfer I suggest listing the trouble codes, look at the cost to replace the given sensor or actuator, and replace the ones that are low cost and easy first. After replacing the part clear the codes with the OBD-II tester and see if the problem remains; it may take a few trips to appear. Change the next lowest cost / easiest part and so forth until the codes go away. One last piece of info you may be able to use (as stated in the owners manual) is if the check engine light is blinking it indicates a misfire, and it only blinks when the misfire is occuring. Misfires are most likely caused by the ignition system which includes the coil on plug system but also spark plugs, which are relatively easy to replace. Sometimes misfires come and go with humidity and type of gasoline used. Premium fuel is often worse for misfires than regular for variety of reasons.
 
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My 2004 T-Bird (24,000 miles) went into limp mode and the Ford agency said it was a throttle body but after they replaced that, it still didn't run right and went into limp mode again, immediately. Then they said that there is a bad module but they can't seem to find one and don't know when they might get one. I am wondering if I needed a throttle body in the first place ($1,600) and does anyone know anything about a module that would get me back on the road?
I had the same problem. Took my 2004 into the local Ford dealership and they at first diagnosed the problem as the throttle body and I think they even ordered a new one and discovered that it did not fix the problem. They then were able to determine that the problem was actually the PCM module which they replaced and the problem was fixed. They did not charge me for the throttle body or any of that labor and the cost of the PCM w/ labor was actually cheaper than their original estimate for the throttle body and labor.
 
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