CBs for Tours

Status
Not open for further replies.
T

thenewtbird2

UPDATE EMAIL ADDRESS
Has anyone installed a CB yet? brand names, etc...? How or where did you install antenna or are you using an "antenna splitter"?
Where would you install the unit so it wouldn't be unslightly but still useable?

Would be nice to have these installed in our 'birds for the Route 66 tour and any other tours that get planned in local areas.
 
thenewbird2, it's been a while sence I was into CB's but you could mount the antenna on the trunk lid with the wire running up and under the hard top. This would not be a permatent hook up but would work for the Route 66 Tour.

------------------
Blue on Blue Prem. STILL WAITING Ordered in Jan. 7of12 NOW 4of12
69 Vette
73 MGB
97 F-150 4x4
2-Seadoo Jet Skies
a dog a cat and a couple hundred fish in my pond
Got Vin. 109293 Build Date 01/14
 
I don't think a 'normal' CB antenna would work on the trunk because it's plastic and the antenna needs a ground plane. That's why the silver shield under the hood, for the Radio. A top load antenna should work, but I wouldn't want to use one because the only way to secure it would be a lip mount, and there is a real danger of chipping the paint edge. Why not use the newer hand held models -- there is no installation necessary, and the distance shouldn't be a problem as you will all be relatively close to each other. You can get one with a plugin to power it from the lighter socket rather than batteries. I believe Radio Shack have some models but I am sure other radio shops have them as well.
 
That is what I was going to suggest too, yellowwing1. FRS radios work as well as CBs in relatively close proximity, are getting cheaper all the time ($25-$50 will get you a good one) and are very easy to handle while driving. They only have 14 channels but is not that hard to find one without other traffic. Some of them have sub-channels that increase the chance of being able to communicate without interference from others in the area. Best of all you won't have that tacky CB antennae ruining the lines of your beautiful bird.

Paul

------------------
#3739 Premium
Torch Red w/matching top
Standard Interior
 
A variation on the FRS idea. There is step up to GFRS or GRS, not sure which. This would cost a bit more but, with rebates, comes in about $50 each. It would give you additional channels and a range up to 5 miles, about what you get with a CB. Just another idea.
 
Hi all:

I want to add a couple of words about using radios on car tours. In my Z3 car club somehow FRS radios became the standard. I have at least 5 years experience and in my opinion they are marginal.

The good things about FRS radios are that they are relatively cheap, easily available, compact, and have way more channels than users. You never have to change channels to get away from other users with FRS.

The biggest problem with FRS is the relatively short range. They are limited to 1/2 watt power to the antenna. Manufacturers quote 2 miles across open space, to me it's more like 1 mile at most. Operating at about 470 MHz, FRS radios are basically line of sight, so if you're on twisty roads or hilly terrain, you will lose the other cars you're traveling with pretty easily.

The other issue with most FRS radios is that they have pretty small speakers. This means the intelligibility is pretty poor, especially in a convertible with the top down. I have taken to using an external 3 inch speaker I bought at Radio Shack, it really helps.

CB radios have a different set of problems. They use a lot more power - 5 watts maximum - so they are much bigger than typical FRS radios. In return for this, you usually have a bigger speaker so they sound better. You also have much better range, both due to the higher power and the 27 MHz operating frequency. You can get 5 miles range repeatably and sometimes much more.

The CB range only has 40 channels so it's occasionally hard to find an open channel, although I bet 90% of the traffic is on channel 19. If you've never listened to the truckers on a big highway it's an eye opening experience!

A decision you have to make with CB radios is that you have to chose between a dash mount unit and a handheld. Dash mount units are the best but they are basically confined to truck drivers these days. Handhelds have lower power but that's basically all you see in cars these days. I have a Cobra handheld which works well, but it's 3 or 4 times the size of my Motorola FRS radio and takes 6 AA batteries vs. 3 for the FRS.

I hope this helps, but I guess the bottom line is that you need to have the same kind of radio everyone else on the drive has!

Tom M.
 
Thanks TomM, brings up another question: I gather from what you say that a person with a CB can't talk with a person with a FRS?? We're inclined towards the CB as we do alot of long distance travel without other cars along so the truck channel(19) is listened to quite frequently. So we may have to have both along with us if many are going to use the FRS
 
Yes Dot that is the case. I have a CB in my bike and didn't want to get one in the car. But with the hand held we could be in touch with our caravan, and even at any events we stop at. Hopefully, while traveling, we won't be that far from our own group. I'll go along with what most think is best, just don't want many scratches on the car from an antenna.
 
Hi Joy,
we use an antenna splitter in our 57 for the CB so we don't get those marks on the trunk, but the downside is a weak antenna connection so our range is about as limited as it appears these hand helds are. It's enough for most travel.
 
Thats a relief,Dot,,,,no marks. Maybe we should figure out what to use, so Tony has one thing less to worry about. And the leaders of each "pod" might just need something alittle stronger.
 
DOT -- you are my hero -- no Cell Phone. I can't do it and admire you for not getting one. Protable CB's are probably the best answer at present for the caravans. We have alot of experience with Gold Wing riders and have found that it is MOST important for the learder and the tail to have constant communication with each other. The more people within the group talk on CB, the more it interferes with the business of leading a train. YOu may want to consider asking the people in the cradle (between the leaders and the tail) to maintain CB radio silence unless it's an emergency. Just my 2cents worth. Remember, safety is the prime concern and it is up to those 2 to get everyone safely to the destenations.
 
David:

I agree with you, CB is probably the best way to go if you absolutely have to cover over a mile.

Just keep in mind, handheld 40 channel CBs run about $100 while FRS radios are less than half that, so you will get fewer people using them.

Tom M
 
All,
The radios that Dot and I use are small 40 channel Radio Shack units. The one in our '57 Bird is mounted in the ashtray (remember those?). The unit is about 7" deep by 1 1/2" by 4" at the front face. They cost about $40 and need an antenae. As Dot said, we use J.C. Whitney antennae splitters. On our other cars I hooked up a cigar lighter plug for power and installed splitters. The splitter cable can be tucked up out of site when not using the radio and the radio just lays loose on the floor when being used. When we don't use the radio, it is tossed in the trunk or put on a shelf in the garage. The speaker in these unit is kinda' small, so I have a radio Shack external speaker to make conversation a little clearer. I'll be using a CB since I already have everything except an antennae splitter for the new T-Bird.
George....
 
All,
The radios that Dot and I use are small 40 channel Radio Shack units. The one in our '57 Bird is mounted in the ashtray (remember those?). The unit is about 7" deep by 1 1/2" by 4" at the front face. They cost about $40 and need an antenae. As Dot said, we use J.C. Whitney antennae splitters. On our other cars I hooked up a cigar lighter plug for power and installed splitters. The splitter cable can be tucked up out of site when not using the radio and the radio just lays loose on the floor when being used. When we don't use the radio, it is tossed in the trunk or put on a shelf in the garage. The speaker in these unit is kinda' small, so I have a radio Shack external speaker to make conversation a little clearer. I'll be using a CB since I already have everything except an antennae splitter for the new T-Bird.
George....
 
We will have a pair of the FRS radios along when we make the 66 trip. They work well for snowmobiling, fishing, road trips with other cars, etc, etc...

DO spend the few extra bucks for ones with subchannels.

If you take them to like Walt Disney World you WILL want to have a subchannel to keep out the noise. Most everyone has them there.
 
I too will be bringing the FR radios on the trip. Maybe if all of us have them, we could make communictions easier for all.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top