2002 Battery disconnect for purge valve repair?

Pops_02
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2002
I'm getting code P0442 and will be replacing the purge valve/solenoid, Is it necessary to disconnect the battery to do the replacement? I have read in a tutorial that the battery must be disconnected, and I would rather not open that can of worms if it's not necessary.
 
biddle

biddle

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Thunderbird Year
2005
I've updated your subject to summarize your question.
 
Bobwheeler

Bobwheeler

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2004
I'm getting code P0442 and will be replacing the purge valve/solenoid, Is it necessary to disconnect the battery to do the replacement? I have read in a tutorial that the battery must be disconnected, and I would rather not open that can of worms if it's not necessary.
On another car particles from the activated charcoal brick caused the purge valve failure. These desintegrate over time. I blew down the line and put a fuel filter in line to stop the migration of particles. When you disassemble the sys., ck for this.
 
Pops_02
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2002
On another car particles from the activated charcoal brick caused the purge valve failure. These desintegrate over time. I blew down the line and put a fuel filter in line to stop the migration of particles. When you disassemble the sys., ck for this.
Thanks, Bob. How can I tell which line to put the filter in, and where is the canister located? (I don't have the DVD or the 2002 TBird manual yet).
 
Bobwheeler

Bobwheeler

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2004
Thanks, Bob. How can I tell which line to put the filter in, and where is the canister located? (I don't have the DVD or the 2002 TBird manual yet).
Like I said, it was on another car, a1998 Pathfinder and there was a youtube video for that car. I have not had to do this repair on my 04 yet but will look for info. The brick has to be near the fuel tank, probably on the fuel fill side. The suction line will run fwd and connect to the purge valve solenoid which should be the one that has failed. Perhaps you can trace the line back. Anybody else been through this drill? Seems I have read something.
 
Bobwheeler

Bobwheeler

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2004
Like I said, it was on another car, a1998 Pathfinder and there was a youtube video for that car. I have not had to do this repair on my 04 yet but will look for info. The brick has to be near the fuel tank, probably on the fuel fill side. The suction line will run fwd and connect to the purge valve solenoid which should be the one that has failed. Perhaps you can trace the line back. Anybody else been through this drill? Seems I have read something.
I the line is full of carbon particle, you have to blow it clear. Took wife and me 12 back and forths at 80 psi.
 
doug7740

doug7740

Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Thunderbird Year
1955
I'm getting code P0442 and will be replacing the purge valve/solenoid, Is it necessary to disconnect the battery to do the replacement? I have read in a tutorial that the battery must be disconnected, and I would rather not open that can of worms if it's not necessary.
I don’t understand what you are afraid of by disconnecting the battery, there is a relearning procedure listed in your owner’s manual. The reason that you should disconnect the battery before replacing any component of the evaporative emission system is because the evaporative emission system contains fuel vapors. By disconnecting the battery you minimize the possibility of causing a fire or explosion if an electrical spark should occur.

The evaporative canister purge valve is located in the engine compartment under a cover near the brake fluid reservoir. If you find charcoal particles in the purge valve that means that the evaporative canister has disintegrated and must be replaced.

EVAP Purge Valve 1.jpg

EVAP Purge Valve 4.jpg
The evaporative emission canister is located on a bracket above the sub frame. To gain access to the canister you must raise the vehicle and lower the rear sub frame to access the canister assembly. You can’t blow air in the line from the purge valve to the evaporative canister to clean it without disconnecting the line at the canister, so you might as well do the job right and replace the canister.

Since the evaporative emission lines are molded plastic lines, I don’t think it would be a good idea to cut these lines to install a filter instead of replacing the evaporative canister.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

EVAP System.jpg
 
Bobwheeler

Bobwheeler

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2004
I don’t understand what you are afraid of by disconnecting the battery, there is a relearning procedure listed in your owner’s manual. The reason that you should disconnect the battery before replacing any component of the evaporative emission system is because the evaporative emission system contains fuel vapors. By disconnecting the battery you minimize the possibility of causing a fire or explosion if an electrical spark should occur.

The evaporative canister purge valve is located in the engine compartment under a cover near the brake fluid reservoir. If you find charcoal particles in the purge valve that means that the evaporative canister has disintegrated and must be replaced.

View attachment 26047

View attachment 26048
The evaporative emission canister is located on a bracket above the sub frame. To gain access to the canister you must raise the vehicle and lower the rear sub frame to access the canister assembly. You can’t blow air in the line from the purge valve to the evaporative canister to clean it without disconnecting the line at the canister, so you might as well do the job right and replace the canister.

Since the evaporative emission lines are molded plastic lines, I don’t think it would be a good idea to cut these lines to install a filter instead of replacing the evaporative canister.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

View attachment 26049
Great advice here. Nissan wanted $500 for a new canister on a car I rarely used. Everything was easy to get to. So I took the easy and cheap way out. Replumbing was easy too. Your choice but one way or another the particles have to go or you will have the same problem again.
 
Pops_02
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2002
Great advice here. Nissan wanted $500 for a new canister on a car I rarely used. Everything was easy to get to. So I took the easy and cheap way out. Replumbing was easy too. Your choice but one way or another the particles have to go or you will have the same problem again.
Thanks for the useful info, Bob. The Autozone report for P0442 (small leak, .04-inch) stated that I need to replace the Evaporative Emissions Vent control valve, but it also says that I need the Canister Vent Valve Solenoid (Part #PV527). Are these 2 names for the same part, or does it require two separate parts? If so, one is next to the brake fluid reservoir, but where is the other located? I will buy the canister as well, if it's not too hard to drop the rear subframe in my driveway. Also what side of the car is the canister located, on the passenger side near the fill tube? (Sorry about all the dumb questions, I just want to make sure I get things right before I buy any parts).
 
doug7740

doug7740

Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Thunderbird Year
1955
You first asked about replacing the purge valve/solenoid and if there are charcoal particles in the purge valve you know that means the evaporative canister has disintegrated and must be replaced. Now Autozone is telling you that you have to replace the Canister Vent Solenoid. Remember, Autozone is a parts store and their job is to sell parts, and that's what I think they are doing. The Canister Vent Solenoid is located above the differental and you will have to lower the differental to access it.

Canister Vent Solenoid.jpg

Code P0442 can also be caused by something as simple as a defective fuel cap. Instead of just replacing parts, don't you think it's time to test and diagnose the evaporative system properly? To do this you will need a scan tool and a leak detector smoke machine. There is a Technical Service Bulletin that outlines how to properly test the evaporative emission system.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

TSB 1.jpg
TSB 2.jpg
TSB 3.jpg
TSB 4.jpg
 
Pops_02
Joined
Dec 8, 2022
Thunderbird Year
2002
You first asked about replacing the purge valve/solenoid and if there are charcoal particles in the purge valve you know that means the evaporative canister has disintegrated and must be replaced. Now Autozone is telling you that you have to replace the Canister Vent Solenoid. Remember, Autozone is a parts store and their job is to sell parts, and that's what I think they are doing. The Canister Vent Solenoid is located above the differental and you will have to lower the differental to access it.

View attachment 26051

Code P0442 can also be caused by something as simple as a defective fuel cap. Instead of just replacing parts, don't you think it's time to test and diagnose the evaporative system properly? To do this you will need a scan tool and a leak detector smoke machine. There is a Technical Service Bulletin that outlines how to properly test the evaporative emission system.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

View attachment 26052
View attachment 26054
View attachment 26056
View attachment 26057
I have already replaced the fuel cap with a new Ford cap, and it was okay for a month or so. I tried cleaning the seal on the new cap and the sealing surface in the filler tube and coating the surfaces with WD40. I still need to reset the code and see if that clears the code. I probably should smoke test the system before buying anything else. Since the T-Bird is not my daily driver, I am in no hurry to fix it. I will be getting a Blue Driver code reader first. I appreciate all your advice, Bob, thanks to you and everyone else on this great forum.
 
Last edited:
Bobwheeler

Bobwheeler

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Thunderbird Year
2004
I don’t understand what you are afraid of by disconnecting the battery, there is a relearning procedure listed in your owner’s manual. The reason that you should disconnect the battery before replacing any component of the evaporative emission system is because the evaporative emission system contains fuel vapors. By disconnecting the battery you minimize the possibility of causing a fire or explosion if an electrical spark should occur.

The evaporative canister purge valve is located in the engine compartment under a cover near the brake fluid reservoir. If you find charcoal particles in the purge valve that means that the evaporative canister has disintegrated and must be replaced.

View attachment 26047

View attachment 26048
The evaporative emission canister is located on a bracket above the sub frame. To gain access to the canister you must raise the vehicle and lower the rear sub frame to access the canister assembly. You can’t blow air in the line from the purge valve to the evaporative canister to clean it without disconnecting the line at the canister, so you might as well do the job right and replace the canister.

Since the evaporative emission lines are molded plastic lines, I don’t think it would be a good idea to cut these lines to install a filter instead of replacing the evaporative canister.

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

View attachment 26049
Great advice here. Nissan wanted $500 for a new canister on a car I rarely used. Everything was easy to get to. So I took the easy and cheap way out. Replumbing was easy too. Your choice but one way or another the particles have to go or you will have the same problem again.
I have already replaced the fuel cap with a new Ford cap, and it was okay for a month or so. I tried cleaning the seal on the new cap and the sealing surface in the filler tube and coating the surfaces with WD40. I still need to reset the code and see if that clears the code. I probably should smoke test the system before buying anything else. Since the T-Bird is not my daily driver, I am in no hurry to fix it. I will be getting a Blue Driver code reader first. I appreciate all your advice, Bob, thanks to you and everyone else on this great forum.
And to Doug7740 for all the technical info provided. I learned a lot.
 
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