1956 Passenger side horn access

I'm in the process of bringing back to life a 56 Bird that has been sitting for 25 years. Finally got it to start and drive, so I have started on the cleanup process. The issue that I have now is one of the horns will not work. The drivers side works, but the passenger side refuses to make a sound. The wire to the horn shows voltage when the horn button is pressed, so I assume it is a bad body ground or a bad horn. Now the problem is what is the best or only way to get to it? Removing the radiator seems like the easiest way to get to it unless there is a 'secret hidden access hole' that I haven't found. The car has an aftermarket A/C installed and the condenser hoses go through the opening right where you would work normally. Any suggestions?
 

tbird

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Staff member
Subject "1956 T'Bird horn" changed to "1956 Passenger side horn access".

model-year-TBF.jpg
 
I'm in the process of bringing back to life a 56 Bird that has been sitting for 25 years. Finally got it to start and drive, so I have started on the cleanup process. The issue that I have now is one of the horns will not work. The drivers side works, but the passenger side refuses to make a sound. The wire to the horn shows voltage when the horn button is pressed, so I assume it is a bad body ground or a bad horn. Now the problem is what is the best or only way to get to it? Removing the radiator seems like the easiest way to get to it unless there is a 'secret hidden access hole' that I haven't found. The car has an aftermarket A/C installed and the condenser hoses go through the opening right where you would work normally. Any suggestions?
I'm in the process of bringing back to life a 56 Bird that has been sitting for 25 years. Finally got it to start and drive, so I have started on the cleanup process. The issue that I have now is one of the horns will not work. The drivers side works, but the passenger side refuses to make a sound. The wire to the horn shows voltage when the horn button is pressed, so I assume it is a bad body ground or a bad horn. Now the problem is what is the best or only way to get to it? Removing the radiator seems like the easiest way to get to it unless there is a 'secret hidden access hole' that I haven't found. The car has an aftermarket A/C installed and the condenser hoses go through the opening right where you would work normally. Any suggestions?
On the 55 removing the grille is the best option. I don't think the 56 grille assembly is much different
 
I'm in the process of bringing back to life a 56 Bird that has been sitting for 25 years. Finally got it to start and drive, so I have started on the cleanup process. The issue that I have now is one of the horns will not work. The drivers side works, but the passenger side refuses to make a sound. The wire to the horn shows voltage when the horn button is pressed, so I assume it is a bad body ground or a bad horn. Now the problem is what is the best or only way to get to it? Removing the radiator seems like the easiest way to get to it unless there is a 'secret hidden access hole' that I haven't found. The car has an aftermarket A/C installed and the condenser hoses go through the opening right where you would work normally. Any suggestions?
Go in through the grill. There are bolts underneath and under the hood. Careful though as it can be a tight fit, as well as the trim and rushing will lead to paint damage. Once the grill is off, access is good.
 
I'm in the process of bringing back to life a 56 Bird that has been sitting for 25 years. Finally got it to start and drive, so I have started on the cleanup process. The issue that I have now is one of the horns will not work. The drivers side works, but the passenger side refuses to make a sound. The wire to the horn shows voltage when the horn button is pressed, so I assume it is a bad body ground or a bad horn. Now the problem is what is the best or only way to get to it? Removing the radiator seems like the easiest way to get to it unless there is a 'secret hidden access hole' that I haven't found. The car has an aftermarket A/C installed and the condenser hoses go through the opening right where you would work normally. Any suggestions?
When I had to remove my horn to replace the horn bracket, I removed the access cover from the lower radiator deflector (stone guard) and worked from underneath.
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doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue
 
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Success !! I ended up removing the sway bar and going through the round access hole in front of the radiator. Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't think the horh would fit through the hole, but it did. On the workbench, the horn worked OK, so the body ground was suspect. I scrapped through 2-3 layers of paint to bare metal, cleaned the terminal, and put it back in. Works as it should. Now to tackle the trans leak. It really likes to 'mark its territory'. Appears to be all the pan bolts and the filler tube flare fitting.
 
Success !! I ended up removing the sway bar and going through the round access hole in front of the radiator. Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't think the horh would fit through the hole, but it did. On the workbench, the horn worked OK, so the body ground was suspect. I scrapped through 2-3 layers of paint to bare metal, cleaned the terminal, and put it back in. Works as it should. Now to tackle the trans leak. It really likes to 'mark its territory'. Appears to be all the pan bolts and the filler tube flare fitting.
Yah electrical gremlins are all about chasing the problem My wife calls my T-bird my mistress.. chasing is all about the thrill .Glad you had success. The feeling of fixing something is why we love working on our cars.
 
Success !! I ended up removing the sway bar and going through the round access hole in front of the radiator. Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't think the horh would fit through the hole, but it did. On the workbench, the horn worked OK, so the body ground was suspect. I scrapped through 2-3 layers of paint to bare metal, cleaned the terminal, and put it back in. Works as it should. Now to tackle the trans leak. It really likes to 'mark its territory'. Appears to be all the pan bolts and the filler tube flare fitting.
I ended up removing the filler tube and putting a small fibre washer into the hole in the pan where it fits. The tube end squeezes onto this washer to help seal. I also used liquid PTFE on the threads. Stopped the leak.
 
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