Grandpa's 1967 T-Bird need advice on fuel pump removal

Hi everyone,

My grandpa past away a few years back, so my uncle and I are attempting to get his 1967 428 ci Thunderbird running and out of the house.

We have isolated the problem to the fuel pump, but we are stumped on how to remove the thing. This car has air conditioning, so access from the top is blocked and same with access from the bottom. We tried removing the power steering pump, but couldn't get it all the way out without removing the bracket that holds it to the engine. The bracket is massive, so I think you have to remove the A/C compressor, which is a huge job on that car.

Does anyone have any advice on how to remove the fuel pump? It would be most appreciated.

Thank you.
 
I just did this on my '68. You'll have to remove the oil filter. You'll also need thin walled sockets. I found various angles for the left bolt which is the hardest one to remove. I ended up using a 3 inch extension with a thin ratchet. The right bolt you just use a 10 inch extension with a loose socket and it was pretty easy to remove through the wheel well. Is not a fast process.
 
Hi everyone,

My grandpa past away a few years back, so my uncle and I are attempting to get his 1967 428 ci Thunderbird running and out of the house.

We have isolated the problem to the fuel pump, but we are stumped on how to remove the thing. This car has air conditioning, so access from the top is blocked and same with access from the bottom. We tried removing the power steering pump, but couldn't get it all the way out without removing the bracket that holds it to the engine. The bracket is massive, so I think you have to remove the A/C compressor, which is a huge job on that car.

Does anyone have any advice on how to remove the fuel pump? It would be most appreciated.

Thank you.
You probably can get to it easier from underneath the car or through the wheel well. Should be 1 rubber line attached to it with a clamp. Take that off first. There will be a steel fuel line with a 9/16- 5/8 or 11/16 nut on it . Take that off. There will be 2 bolts on each side of it. Probably 1/2" . Take those out . Pull the fuel pump off. No need to take off all kinds of brackets and such. You might have to clean all the old gasket off if it's ripped or torn up. If not I use Indian head gasket sealer. Comes in a lil round brown bottle. GOOD LUCK
 
Don't use permetex or whatever slop people suggest. You can still get the gasket. Just lay a very thin bead of gasket maker so the gasket sticks to the surface of the engine. Make sure to clean off the old mating surface and be ABSOLUTELY sure the rod is on the right side of the cam when reinstalling the fuel pump or you will damage the new pump and camshaft. Honestly in my experience getting the bolts out is the easy part. Getting everything properly lined back up and putting the bolts back in without cross-threading them is the real challenge.
 
Don't use permetex or whatever slop people suggest. You can still get the gasket. Just lay a very thin bead of gasket maker so the gasket sticks to the surface of the engine. Make sure to clean off the old mating surface and be ABSOLUTELY sure the rod is on the right side of the cam when reinstalling the fuel pump or you will damage the new pump and camshaft. Honestly in my experience getting the bolts out is the easy part. Getting everything properly lined back up and putting the bolts back in without cross-threading them is the real challenge.
Wouldn't the gasket maker also be slop you're referring to? Permetex, silicone, Indian head, are all the same slop gasket maker you're talking about. Don't be so fast to judge what other mechanics preferences are. You do yours and we'll do ours. I would love to see you install a fuel pump and gasket without a sealer and not have it leak.
 
Don't use permetex or whatever slop people suggest. You can still get the gasket. Just lay a very thin bead of gasket maker so the gasket sticks to the surface of the engine. Make sure to clean off the old mating surface and be ABSOLUTELY sure the rod is on the right side of the cam when reinstalling the fuel pump or you will damage the new pump and camshaft. Honestly in my experience getting the bolts out is the easy part. Getting everything properly lined back up and putting the bolts back in without cross-threading them is the real challenge.
Read my post again it says you shouldn't have to replace the gasket if it's not ripped or torn. If you want to go through the hassle of digging it all off just to replace it with a new one have at it. I'll use a bead of Indian head gasket maker and have the same effect.
 
Read my post again it says you shouldn't have to replace the gasket if it's not ripped or torn. If you want to go through the hassle of digging it all off just to replace it with a new one have at it. I'll use a bead of Indian head gasket maker and have the same effect.
The problem I found out was that just trying to get the darn pump lined up and set causes you to smear a lot of the stuff around.
 
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