1957 Hi-Torque Starter Motor

Has anyone installed a hi-torque starter motor on their 1957 312 cu. in. engine? I noticed they are available. It appears the pinion enters from the front whereas the stock comes in from the rear. If the ring gear is cut from the back, it looks like the H-T pinion would strike the sharp side of the teeth vs. tapered side. While it may work, it seems like it would be damaged.
 

Ward 57

Well-Known Member
Has anyone installed a hi-torque starter motor on their 1957 312 cu. in. engine? I noticed they are available. It appears the pinion enters from the front whereas the stock comes in from the rear. If the ring gear is cut from the back, it looks like the H-T pinion would strike the sharp side of the teeth vs. tapered side. While it may work, it seems like it would be damaged.
Just stick with stock. Once they went to 12V starting, problems pretty much disappeared. Why mess with what works. I have the same attitude about electric fuel pumps. Crank it until the oil light goes out and then pump the throttle to set the choke and prime. Lets the oil pressure build before stressing the bearings. Wise words from a race car engine builder. That's why they have separate cranking and ignition switches.
 
I have a friend named Albert who use to rebuilt starters and generators. The original starter for the early birds is essentially the same as the one Ford manufactured since the early 1920's. Powermaster currently manufactures a "Gear Reduction" starter to fit Ford Y-Blocks that supposedly works far better that the originals. This may be my course of action since my bird is currently in the shop.
 

jack-in-sac

Well-Known Member
Why do you wish to change your starter? After knowing this, it may be easier to evaluate the proposed change. I do point out that I do not know anyone with a 12 volt Y-block who has changed to a "hi-torque" starter unless it was a race car with very high compression and a very lumpy camshaft. If you are having starter problems there may be a cause other than the starter itself.
 
Why do you wish to change your starter? After knowing this, it may be easier to evaluate the proposed change. I do point out that I do not know anyone with a 12 volt Y-block who has changed to a "hi-torque" starter unless it was a race car with very high compression and a very lumpy camshaft. If you are having starter problems there may be a cause other than the starter itself.
As on an earlier post, my starter is jammed. So, getting it off will be enough of a challenge let alone installing a stock type. The hi-torque being smaller should be easier to install.
 

jack-in-sac

Well-Known Member
As on an earlier post, my starter is jammed. So, getting it off will be enough of a challenge let alone installing a stock type. The hi-torque being smaller should be easier to install.
If the need is easier install that makes sense. I do not know if the price makes sense but the idea does.
 
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