1956 carb to manifold tube

Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1956
My 56 has this partially insulated tube running from carb (choke) to manifold. I have only seen this on one other 56. What is this part called and what is its function? Why do pics of other 56's not have this?
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20220511-210607.png
    Screenshot_20220511-210607.png
    2.2 MB · Views: 18
  • Screenshot_20220511-212046.png
    Screenshot_20220511-212046.png
    2.8 MB · Views: 17
Joined
Mar 18, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1956
It so happens we were just looking at this part on my 56, but it has the factory-installed style of this tube (short, goes basically straight down just a few inches into the manifold). This is part #9820, on p. 4194 of the Parts Manual, Thermostatic choke control inlet tube.

1652319561884.png
 

74 Harley

Active Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Thunderbird Year
1962
The function is to bring warm air into the choke spring to warm it up. This opens the choke as the motor warms up.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1956
It so happens we were just looking at this part on my 56, but it has the factory-installed style of this tube (short, goes basically straight down just a few inches into the manifold). This is part #9820, on p. 4194 of the Parts Manual, Thermostatic choke control inlet tube.

View attachment 22107
You are all over this question. Thank you for such an expert and quick response. I am curious as to why I don't see this on many videos or photo of other 56's? Do they have a different means of warming up the carb?
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1956
Thanks for the a ice responses. In an attempt to install a new tube the hole in the manifold was clogged. In the process of cleaning out the hole in the manifold we discovered it contained some very shiny, clean pieces of aluminum. I will attach a pic of this stuff. What is it? What was it designed to do?
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20220512-192114.png
    Screenshot_20220512-192114.png
    3.2 MB · Views: 3
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Thunderbird Year
1956
Neither pictures above is correct for a 56 Bird. The second pic is for a 57. The first is a later modification using a later exhaust manifold. Also note that there is a second tube on the drivers side that attaches to the crossover tube in the intake manifold that goes into a hole in the carb body

All this is if you have the stock carb.
 

jimntempe

Active Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1957
View attachment 22158

doug7740
1955 Thunderbird Blue

Quite interesting. From what I see on the parts diagram combined with what you just outlined it seems to me what's shown as the "service installation" parts were to fix the problem you described, the tube burning out and clogging. In the left side where they show the production parts they make a distinction between the 56 parts and the 57 parts which I presume is because the 56 used the teapot and the 57 used the holley. The "service parts kit" has plugs for where that burned out tube went across and a replacement "heat stove" to put down on the exhaust manifold. All of which to presumably make the repair quick and easy with no need to remove the manifold.
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1956
I agree with Jim. What I see in the picture looks very close to the "Service Installation" version (that is "stock", if you will). It's not what came out of the factory, but it's per the Ford Parts Manual for both years. So it's not "wrong", it's just "different" than the as-built-at-the-factory system, but it's still per the Ford engineers. I.e., it's not something somebody just made up or cobbled together on their own. (The insulation is almost all missing, though, apparently worn or rotted away...part #9865).
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2019
Thunderbird Year
1957
Quite interesting. From what I see on the parts diagram combined with what you just outlined it seems to me what's shown as the "service installation" parts were to fix the problem you described, the tube burning out and clogging. In the left side where they show the production parts they make a distinction between the 56 parts and the 57 parts which I presume is because the 56 used the teapot and the 57 used the holley. The "service parts kit" has plugs for where that burned out tube went across and a replacement "heat stove" to put down on the exhaust manifold. All of which to presumably make the repair quick and easy with no need to remove the manifold.
After I had my engine replaced 30ys ago I neglected to re torque the heads after break in. Blew a head gasket and had to pull the top end. Replaced my heat tube in the process as I had the intake manifold off anyway. .
 

cokefirst

Active Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Thunderbird Year
1955
Gil is correct on the choke heater tube. These tubes will last for years but will not last forever. Whenever I remove an intake manifold from a Y block, I always replace that tube. it is a 5 minute job with the manifold off the car.

Your car looks like they bypassed the factory set up and installed an aftermarket choke tube from the exhaust manifold. If it were my car, I would put it back to original.
 

jimntempe

Active Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1957
just to add another 2 cents.. Years and years and years ago when I had cars for regular use not much newer than these several of them had these kinds of heat tube choke systems. The ones I had didn't use thru the intake manifold crossover, the heat stove sat in a cubby cast into the exhaust manifold. I'm sure non of them leaked as I would have heard the leak. Yet they all coked up with carbon every year and I'd have to pull the tubes off and clean them out along with cleaning out the inside of the choke thermostat spring housing too. I think two things were going on. One is that these don't pull much air thru, if they did it would amount to a vacuum leak, so they are only pulling a small amount of air so the hot end is always REALLY hot. The other thing is that the stove end that's VERY hot likely cooks any dust into carbon that gets sucked in as well as oxidizing the metal insides of the tube making rust dust. End result is the tubes often rot out and/or the small hole that meters the vacuum clogs and/or the spring housing guts just corrode and stick. I know people do like originality but if you are willing to let that go an electric choke is likely to be a lot less trouble in the long run.
 
Top