1974 Torque converter best stall speed?

Joined
Sep 10, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1974
Hi everybody.
For my '74, 460ci C6, basically stock with just a bigger carb and a mild camshaft I am looking for a newer torque converter.
Not interested in performance, just smooth driving.
I was originally thinking about a 1900-200RPM stall like the B&M 40427 but I have been recommended for a lower stall speed (1200RPM) like the Hughes performance F43Fuel.
I am puzzled on wheter the performance increase in the engine would require an higher stall speed or I can get away with the 1200rpm one.
 
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Thunderbird Year
1964
Contact the manufacture of the camshaft that you installed and they would be able to tell you what stall converter that would match its profile. When you say mild camshaft that covers a lot of territory and a lot of territory covers many stall speed recommendations.
Hope this helps

Ed
 

74 Harley

Active Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2020
Thunderbird Year
1962
You really don't want a higher than stock stall converter on a car you plan on driving.
Higher stall converters are used when an engine won't idle at a low rpm because of the cam profile. This can make for uncomfortable/rough take offs because the stall converter comes on hard at the set rpm. If your engine idles correctly (or close to it) you don't need it. Stall converters are meant for the drag strip.
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1974
You really don't want a higher than stock stall converter on a car you plan on driving.
Higher stall converters are used when an engine won't idle at a low rpm because of the cam profile. This can make for uncomfortable/rough take offs because the stall converter comes on hard at the set rpm. If your engine idles correctly (or close to it) you don't need it. Stall converters are meant for the drag strip.
Thanks +agree, but no idea of the stock converter rpm.
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1974
Contact the manufacture of the camshaft that you installed and they would be able to tell you what stall converter that would match its profile. When you say mild camshaft that covers a lot of territory and a lot of territory covers many stall speed recommendations.
Hope this helps

Ed
Duration 252/252, Lift .468/.468 (from this kit)
 
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Thunderbird Year
1964
Duration 252/252, Lift .468/.468 (from this kit)
Factory converters on C6's was 1600-1800 RPM's, so with those specs on your cam you will be fine with a stock converter. Don't be confused about stall speeds being the RPM's at which the convertor transfers the RPM's to the transmission. It is the RPM's at which the converter is at 100% fluid coupling. The higher the stall speed the higher the RPM are to achieve 100% coupling. This allows for compensation of higher duration and higher lift camshafts. The more cam you have the higher the PRM powerband will be in your engine and a higher stall converter compensates for the loss of low end power. My engine in my 64 has a 220/230 duration @ .050 lift, .498/.517 valve lift camshaft and I have a 2200 stall converter and you can't tell any difference in operation. Very well behaved setup. Check out You Tube for some torque converter videos..
Take care
Ed
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2021
Thunderbird Year
1974
Factory converters on C6's was 1600-1800 RPM's, so with those specs on your cam you will be fine with a stock converter. .....
Take care
Ed
I don't live in the US, and the one issue is precisely I have not bee able insofar to find online any ''stock converter'' for my thunderbird, that's why I am puzzled about all these aftermaket ones offered online with all these different stall speeds.
 
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